Dominican Sisters Cabra http://www.dominicansisters.com Dominican Sisters Cabra Tue, 09 Feb 2016 13:01:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Points/questions for politicians and canvassers – from the Dominican Justice Office http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/pointsquestions-for-politicians-and-canvassers-from-the-dominican-justice-office/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/pointsquestions-for-politicians-and-canvassers-from-the-dominican-justice-office/#respond Tue, 09 Feb 2016 12:57:26 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?p=5100 Points/questions for politicians and canvassers  – Prepared by the Dominican Justice Officeimages

1st February 2016

I have included links to relevant material – please copy and paste directly into your browser.

  • Report on the Protection Process in Ireland: Ask politicians for their position on the recommendations of Report of the Working Group on Direct Provision (full title is ‘Working Group to Report to Government Working Group on the Protection Process on Improvements to the Protection Process, including Direct Provision and Supports to Asylum Seekers’), which was published in June 2015. The recommendations have yet to be implemented. The full report is available to read here:

http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Report%20to%20Government%20on%20Improvements%20to%20the%20Protection%20Process,%20including%20Direct%20Provision%20and%20Supports%20to%20Asylum%20Seekers.pdf/Files/Report%20to%20Government%20on%20Improvements%20to%20the%20Protection%20Process,%20including%20Direct%20Provision%20and%20Supports%20to%20Asylum%20Seekers.pdf

A summary of the report is available to read here: http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Executive%20Summary%20of%20the%20Report%20to%20Government%20on%20Improvements%20to%20the%20Protection%20Process……pdf/Files/Executive%20Summary%20of%20the%20Report%20to%20Government%20on%20Improvements%20to%20the%20Protection%20Process……pdf

The Dominican Justice Office believes that the full implementation of the recommendations of the Working Group is the first step towards making critical improvements to the protection process for people seeking asylum in Ireland.

 

  • Enacting Hate Crime Legislation: ENAR Ireland (The Irish Network against Racism) has launched a ‘Love Not Hate’ calling on the government to enact the Criminal Law (Hate Crime) Bill immediately to protect minorities in Ireland. Ireland, unlike other EU Countries, has no hate crime legislation. As explained on the ENAR website:

“Enacting Hate Crime Legislation would place us among the majority of countries in the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), the European and common law countries. It would help Ireland meet its European Union and International obligations.

We need to send a clear message that racism and hate have no place in our communities and that our society should be inclusive of all. We must break the silence on hate crime, encourage people to report it, and find effective ways to address all forms of racism and prejudice.”

As well as asking politicians to support the enactment of the Bill, you can sign a petition asking the Minister for Justice and Equality Frances Fitzgerald to respond to this issue here: https://my.uplift.ie/petitions/love-not-hate-unite-to-legislate-against-hate-crime and print out a template letter for your elected representative here: http://enarireland.org/hate-crime-letter-template-to-politicians/

More information and a very good video about this legislation are available on the ENAR Ireland website here: http://enarireland.org/hatecrime/

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Points/questions for politicians and canvassers http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/pointsquestions-for-politicians-and-canvassers/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/pointsquestions-for-politicians-and-canvassers/#respond Tue, 09 Feb 2016 12:49:57 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?p=5114 Prepared by the Dominican Justice Office

1st February 2016

 

I have included links to relevant material – please copy and paste directly into your browser.

 

  • Report on the Protection Process in Ireland: Ask politicians for their position on the recommendations of Report of the Working Group on Direct Provision (full title is ‘Working Group to Report to Government Working Group on the Protection Process on Improvements to the Protection Process, including Direct Provision and Supports to Asylum Seekers’), which was published in June 2015. The recommendations have yet to be implemented. The full report is available to read here:

http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Report%20to%20Government%20on%20Improvements%20to%20the%20Protection%20Process,%20including%20Direct%20Provision%20and%20Supports%20to%20Asylum%20Seekers.pdf/Files/Report%20to%20Government%20on%20Improvements%20to%20the%20Protection%20Process,%20including%20Direct%20Provision%20and%20Supports%20to%20Asylum%20Seekers.pdf

 

 

A summary of the report is available to read here:

http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Executive%20Summary%20of%20the%20Report%20to%20Government%20on%20Improvements%20to%20the%20Protection%20Process……pdf/Files/Executive%20Summary%20of%20the%20Report%20to%20Government%20on%20Improvements%20to%20the%20Protection%20Process……pdf

 

 

The Dominican Justice Office believes that the full implementation of the recommendations of the Working Group is the first step towards making critical improvements to the protection process for people seeking asylum in Ireland.

 

  • Enacting Hate Crime Legislation: ENAR Ireland (The Irish Network against Racism) has launched a ‘Love Not Hate’ calling on the government to enact the Criminal Law (Hate Crime) Bill immediately to protect minorities in Ireland. Ireland, unlike other EU Countries, has no hate crime legislation. As explained on the ENAR website:

“Enacting Hate Crime Legislation would place us among the majority of countries in the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), the European and common law countries. It would help Ireland meet its European Union and International obligations.

We need to send a clear message that racism and hate have no place in our communities and that our society should be inclusive of all. We must break the silence on hate crime, encourage people to report it, and find effective ways to address all forms of racism and prejudice.”

As well as asking politicians to support the enactment of the Bill, you can sign a petition asking the Minister for Justice and Equality Frances Fitzgerald to respond to this issue here: https://my.uplift.ie/petitions/love-not-hate-unite-to-legislate-against-hate-crime and print out a template letter for your elected representative here: http://enarireland.org/hate-crime-letter-template-to-politicians/

More information and a very good video about this legislation are available on the ENAR Ireland website here: http://enarireland.org/hatecrime/

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The Sister’s Café http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/the-sisters-cafe/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/the-sisters-cafe/#respond Mon, 08 Feb 2016 12:55:44 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?p=5109 Sisters Cafe Poster

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2015 Highlights from the Dominican Sister in Iraq http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/2015-highlights-from-the-dominican-sister-in-iraq/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/2015-highlights-from-the-dominican-sister-in-iraq/#respond Mon, 08 Feb 2016 12:38:41 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?p=5105 Read below article from Order of Preachers Newsletterorder of Preachers

2015 Highlights from the Dominican Sister in Iraq

 

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5th Sunday in Ordinary Time (7th February) http://www.dominicansisters.com/homily/5th-sunday-in-ordinary-time-7th-february/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/homily/5th-sunday-in-ordinary-time-7th-february/#respond Thu, 04 Feb 2016 13:12:26 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?post_type=portfolio&p=5097 This week we have the call of Jesus’s first friends. They are brothers and partners at work which happened to be a good trade at that time in Palestine. Crowds present were pressing around Jesus so he used the natural amplification of the water to carry his voice and message to the people and borrowed Peters’ boat, climbed in and sat down to teach as Jewish Rabbis always do. He asked Peter to row out a little and then Jesus gave a homily. We don’t know what it was about but there was a call in it for Peter who had remarkable insight into his own character. Peter was asked to catch fish in the daytime. Having struggled all night and having caught nothing Simon Peter was doubtful but he did what he was told. To the amazement of all they netted a superabundance of fish, so many as to need another boat to be filled to the brim. The four friends were speechless at such a catch until Simon Peter spoke: “Leave me, Lord, I am sinful”. Peter with all his imperfections threw himself upon Divine Mercy. So many people have changed because of this quote.

Similar to Isaiah’s call (Is.6) Jesus told him not to be afraid. This phrase occurs very many times throughout the Bible and is applicable to each one of us today. We are all called to catch and attract people by radiating and sharing God’s love to those with whom we live and to all with whom we come in contact with throughout each day. To do this we have to be unattached to whatever blocks us from following Jesus, and not to be afraid. Look up Isaiah 49:1: Reflect and apply it to yourself now.cavan april 20 2010 406 - Copy

There are over 700 calls in the Bible. Our first call was at Baptism, when we joined God’s family of love. A call is an invitation awaiting a response. When we look upon events as events that just happen to us, our behaviour will be one of reaction and not response. To respond is behaviour proper to the human person gifted with free will and intelligence. It is not a call until it is heard. It is not effective until it is accepted. The mystery of sin is not to hear the call or respond to the choice. God’s call is always an invitation, never a forced summons. God calls us daily and doesn’t ask if we are suitable, only if we are available.

Our destiny depends on our response to God, because we are products of an unconditional Lover so we can choose by responding positively with a “Yes,” or negatively with a “No” so choose well.

1. When was the last time I heard a call and answered it positively? Could you share that example with a friend of yours?
2. Can you recall a time when you ignored the call and reacted selfishly? You could share this with Jesus and try to do better today.

Sr Dympna Travers O.P

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Dominican Family at UN Climate Change Conference (COP 21) http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/dominican-family-at-un-climate-change-conference-cop-21/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/dominican-family-at-un-climate-change-conference-cop-21/#respond Wed, 03 Feb 2016 09:51:32 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?p=5084 Below is an extract from a letter sent by Fr. Mike Deep OP

We call on all Dominicans and all Dominican communities to play their part in the salvation of our planet by:

1. Continuing to educate ourselves within various Dominican fora about climate change, its science and mitigation and adaptation strategies, and by investing in sending members to ecological and environmental education that shows the connection between these issues and all other issues.

2. Organising community meetings to become more informed of lifestyles that contribute to climate change, and to discuss how each community and each individual can adjust their lifestyles to model the changes that need to occur if we are to avoid catastrophic climate change. This would include ways to implement sources of renewable energy in convents and motherhouses, reduce meat consumption and carbon-­‐emitting transport.

3. Raising a permanent consciousness of the need for a personal response. We learnt of a worldwide movement where some people take turns to fast everyday to maintain such a consciousness. In line with our own religious tradition, a creative suggestion could be for each community to embark on such a fast with willing participants taking turns on a roster to fast daily and/or for communities to consider reverting back to fasting from meat on Fridays and joining the “Meatless Mondays” movement.

4. Continually advocating strongly with our own governments:
a. to reduce fossil-­‐fuel energy generation -­‐ using coal, gas (fracking), oil,… -­‐ in favour of investing massively in renewable energy (solar, wind, water, wave,…).
b. to support, financially and otherwise, all other countries – especially poor, developing countries – to gain the necessary technology to effect such an energy generation conversion.
c. to invest massively in support systems for areas affected permanently by climate change (through typhoons, floods, droughts,…) so that people living there can still gain a livelihood and not be forced to become climate refugees.

5. Directing our ministry responses and investments in line with SDGs* that pertain to ecosystems’ conservation and restoration and with all other environmental
ministries that will contribute towards achieving the COP21 Paris Agreement goals.

6. Reviewing our Dominican rules/constitutions/statutes to take into account the integrity of creation, integral ecology and ecological conversion.To assist us on this journey, we hope to establish an ongoing virtual group that will continue this reflection and the promotion of climate justice. Anyone who wishes to join this group is welcome to contact Fr Aristide Basse at abassearistide@yahoo.fr.

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*The UN General Assembly adopted its post-­‐2015 development agenda in September 2015, on the same day that Pope Francis addressed the world’s leaders. Unlike other General Assembly meetings, the issue of climate change was placed front and center, along with its inextricable connection to the plight of those who are most marginalized and vulnerable. The new agenda – Agenda 2030 – includes 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): See
https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300
These 17 goals pick up where the Millennium Development Goals left off, with some very significant additions: the SDGs apply to all countries, not just the developing world; sustainability is to be at the core of future development; and climate change must be addressed if the needs of people and planet are to be met. In light of the agreement reached in Paris at the meeting of COP 21, these elements of the SDGs take on added significance: Goal 2 – promotion of sustainable agriculture; Goal 6 – availability and sustainable management of water; Goal 7 – access to affordable, reliable and sustainable modern energy for all; Goal 12 -­‐ ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns; Goal 13 – take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts; Goal 14 – conservation and sustainable use of oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.
Regarding the SDGs, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said, “We want to change our world, and we can.” However, the only true test of commitment is implementation. Now that Agenda 2030 has been adopted, and there is a relatively positive outcome to the Paris Climate Summit, implementation becomes the responsibility of national capitals. This being the case, our role as members of civil society is more important than ever, in helping to ensure that the SDGs touch the lives of those who are most vulnerable, and that they are implemented in such a way that the integrity of Earth is respected.

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World Interfaith Harmony Week 1-7 Feb 2016, http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/world-interfaith-harmony-week-1-7-feb-2016/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/world-interfaith-harmony-week-1-7-feb-2016/#respond Mon, 01 Feb 2016 15:41:12 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?p=5087 To mark the World Interfaith Harmony Week  1-7 Feb 2016, Dublin City Interfaith forum is delighted to invite you to following events:

downloadFaith In The City – DCIF’s series of exploratory sessions of faith and culture is continuing with the first session of 2016 to be held at the Indian Orthodox Church based in St. George & St. Thomas Church, Cathal Brugha St. Dublin 1 on Monday 1st February from 6.30 pm to 8 pm. Please feel free to circulate with local community and voluntary groups, schools etc.as this is a great opportunity to experience a place of worship first hand, and learn about its spiritual,cultural significance and meaning.

Directions:

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Church+of+Saint+George+and+Saint+Thomas/@53.3524339,-6.2617571,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x48670e86f504f5a7:0xa0aec3c151f3c2c5

Margaret Noble – The Mother of India This is the keynote event within the World Interfaith Harmony Week and consists of a conference and exhibition on the life and work of Margaret E Noble, also known as Sister Nivedita, in recognition of her vital contributions to the national and educational life of India.  This event is organized by DCIF in association with Dublin City Council, VHCCI, Indian Embassy, Eire Vedanta Society and will take place on Wednesday, 3rd February 2016 from 5 pm – 8 pm in Wood Quay Venue, Wood Quay, Dublin 8.

Directions:

https://www.google.ie/maps/place/Dublin+City+Council/@53.3446257,-6.2726541,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x48670c27d0931c15:0xdded9e30c25b07da

RSVP: adrian@dublincityinterfaithforum.org

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My Vocation Story – Sr Paul Cloete OP http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/my-vocation-story-sr-paul-cloete-op/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/my-vocation-story-sr-paul-cloete-op/#respond Mon, 01 Feb 2016 09:56:38 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?p=5076 Sr. PaulSr Paul is a semi-retired Sister living in Springfield, South Africa and does various ministries, including being the spiritual director of the Lay Dominicans in Cape Town and using her giftedness as a Sacristan in the Convent Chapel in Springfield.

I was born in Matjieskloof, South Africa in 1935.  My family and I later moved to Matroosfontein, where I attended Holy Trinity, a Dominican School, until I was fourteen.  Whilst there, I got to know the Dominican Sisters and joined the Children of Mary Sodality.

I was drawn to the Dominican way of life, and spoke to Mother Catherine Dixon, the Spiritual Director of the Children of Mary Sodality, about joining the Convent.    Mother Catherine advised me to pray about it, and in 1953, I made up my mind to join the Dominican Sisters.

The person who inspired me most was my mother who taught me about the faith and moral values.  She often spoke about the Sisters she had known when she lived in an orphanage and assured me that I was   making the right  decision to follow God’s Call and become a Dominican Sister.

I have now been a Cabra Dominican Sister for over 50 years and although I admit that it was sometimes tough, I also remember highlights of my life in the Convent.  I   enjoyed the experience of living with different cultures, for example, the Irish culture and my own Coloured culture.  I also loved teaching in Kirkwood and spending time with the people there whom I describe as “simple and lovely”.

I live a life committed to learning and teaching, prayer and preaching the Word of God, not only by speaking but also by my actions, and helping and encouraging the growth of my community.  Besides all my usual duties as a Dominican Sister, I taught at St Reginald’s, Kirkwood, for 10 years.  I also did supervision in the Boarding School after school and on the weekends, as well as attending Out-stations for Mass on Sundays, where I met many people and children.

The Dominican ideal that has been around for centuries and that so inspired my life is still very relevant for us today.  Whether we are Christian or not, the search for Truth in all things is an ideal that we should all learn to live by, as it can make us happier and better people, and the world a happier and better place.

 

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4th Sunday in Ordinary Time (31 January) http://www.dominicansisters.com/homily/4th-sunday-in-ordinary-time-31-january/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/homily/4th-sunday-in-ordinary-time-31-january/#respond Fri, 29 Jan 2016 10:15:54 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?post_type=portfolio&p=5073 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time….no prophet is ever accepted in his own country”

When I was looking at this gospel and wondering what I could write I was surprised to see how closely this passage followed on last Sunday’s Gospel. So why have the Church Fathers made this arrangement? The very last sentence is repeated as the first sentence today.

It has been said that the message of today is that Jesus has been sent to everyone – not only the Jews. This was hard for the Jews to swallow as they considered themselves the Chosen People – the people to whom the Messiah would come. And so they turned on Jesus and whereas He was given great approval as He spoke the people soon changed their mind and chased Jesus out of their town. Indeed they would have killed Him if He hadn’t escaped.

Often the 1st Reading has a connection to the Gospel. I believe the words spoken to Jeremiah by the Lord could refer to Jesus in His situation in the synagogue. The Lord assures them of His support at all times despite the many attacks etc. they will be asked to suffer.

Look again at the 1st Reading and see the comfort it holds; ….I knew you, I have appointed you….Do not be dismayed,……I will make you into a fortified city. And last and greatest of all;”…for I am with you to deliver you”

What more can I say? Let us rest in that great love and care The Lord has for us……and be grateful. Amen.

Sr. Patricia O’Reilly OP

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My Vocation Story – Sr. Kathleen Fitzsimons OP http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/my-vocation-story-sr-kathleen-fitzsimons-op/ http://www.dominicansisters.com/2016/my-vocation-story-sr-kathleen-fitzsimons-op/#respond Tue, 26 Jan 2016 12:48:52 +0000 http://www.dominicansisters.com/?p=5063 Sr. KathleenAfter forty years in religious life I ask how did I get to this day?  I feel joy and I am blessed that I am able to spend time in personal prayer before Morning Prayer with my community of nine after which I attend Mass in a local church. I recently prepared for the annual Dominican Youth Forum, which takes place in November. The focus of the Forum this year was the encyclical of Pope Francis, Laudato Si, on care of the earth, our common home, which of course also includes the care of our brothers and sisters who are seeking refuge in foreign lands. Teenagers from Dominican Schools all over Ireland, with some of their teachers, attend this annual event. At the end of the day each school took with them a plant, which they potted, reminding them of their hope to grow in the understanding of ecological issues.

I was born in the beautiful tree-lined village of Killough in County Down and have always felt a little different from others.   My mother was born and raised High Church of England. She began her life in Wales, then moved to England; finally settling in Ireland. World War II began when she was a teenager and the family made their home in Ardglass, a place to which they had come for the summers.  As well as being high church, she was devout.  My father was a conservative Catholic from Downpatrick and equally devout. However, they were different in their attitudes:  my mother questioned everything and my father questioned nothing. So we grew up wondering with my mother why priests could not marry, as my mother’s cousin had done, and have a family as well as ministering to their flock. We were told in no uncertain terms by my father that that was not the way it worked. The questions continued: Why were we controlled by so many rules and regulations in the church? Why send the children to Mass on a cold, rainy day? Heresy!

My father had a sprinkling of priests and nuns in the family but my mother had never met a nun until the day she brought me up to see the Dominican Sr Jacqueline before starting my secondary education in Fortwilliam Park.  Now there were more questions. My mother was baffled by it all. I honestly think she never completely understood what it meant to be a Sister until the day she died. When I gently broke the news to her, at age sixteen, that I was thinking about becoming a nun, she was stunned.  More questions followed. What was the point? Why would I do that with my life? The problem was that I could not really answer her. I was not a bit sure myself but knew that it was a way of life I needed to try.

After my years of formation in Dublin, I went to teach in Galway. But five years later, I went to South America, first to Bolivia to learn Spanish and then to Argentina. There I encountered a model of church my mother would have understood. It was the people’s church. I lived in a rural town, which had six small communities. We lived and prayed together. Even though some of the people could not read, they understood the message of Jesus, which was read to them sometimes by their children. The Bible had pride of place in their home and it did not gather dust. At the weekend Mass, having reflected on the scripture readings in community during the week, they understood what they were all about. We walked together through joys and sorrows. Though a bout of typhoid fever brought me back to Ireland after twelve years I still appreciate that model of church and hold my mother’s questionings close to my heart.

One day in the future I may wake up to the cocks crowing in South America and after some personal prayer join my community (townspeople and sisters) for Morning Prayer. Who knows how that day may evolve?

 

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