Below read a Statement by US Religious Leaders

On Behalf of the Council of Presidents and Executive Council of Religions for Peace USA
August 14, 2017

Regarding the “Unite the Right” gatherings in Charlottesville, Virginia

As leaders of U.S. faith communities, we are deeply troubled and saddened by the recent discrimination and violence witnessed in the “Unite the Right” gatherings in Charlottesville, Virginia during August 11-12, 2017.

We express profound sorrow and grief over the injuries and tragic loss of life carried out in the name of hate. Our prayers are with the families of Heather Heyer and Virginia State Police Officers, Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates.

We join voices and hands with many in speaking out and witnessing unequivocally against the racism, xenophobia, religious intolerance, and additional forms of “othering” that are now so publicly manifest in our culture. We stand together, united for peace.

There is no place in our nation for white nationalism and white supremacy, racism, or any form of identity or faith-based violence or prejudice, including anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. Such positions are utterly contrary to the values of each of our faith traditions and are contrary to our shared understanding of human dignity. There is always room to address the underlying fears that give rise to intolerance; however, violence is not an acceptable response.

As leaders of the US affiliate of the world’s largest interreligious organization, Religions for Peace, we join a great multitude of sisters and brothers in faith to condemn bigotry, to call for civil discourse, and to insist upon ways to foster understanding, healing, and hope.

We are concerned for communities where additional “alt-right” and white nationalist gatherings are planned in the coming weeks. We call for peaceful witness demonstrating that love surpasses hate.

We ask for clear and unambiguous communication from our political officials in these matters. We invite thoughtful and purposed engagement by people of faith in creating conversations and setting higher standards for civil decency and discourse.

For more information:
Executive Director, Donna Bollinger, dbollinger@rfpusa.org

 

 

As in all Dominican communities, the Channel Row nuns were devoted to the church’s liturgy, especially the Mass and the Divine Office. These were enhanced by good music (as testified in Part 6) and an organ donated by the Bellew family. The chapel was adorned, with paintings, the altar with silver candlesticks, and silver sacred vessels were used during worship. Most of these were gifts to the community from various family members and benefactors, and have survived the vicissitudes of time -from Channel Row to Clontarf and finally to Cabra from 1819. If only they could speak of the many events of which they were part, and ‘witnessed’ during 300 years!

Aspects of the nuns’ spirituality are reflected in the books listed in the convent library. Titles included (in 1726) were various works of St Teresa [of Avila] and St Francis de Sales, Four Meditation Books, one Martiroligie, one Processionary, [the latter two refer to memorials, ceremonials and chants celebrated in the liturgy. [to be continued in Part 8]

From Sr. Maris Stella McKeown, Archivist, Mission Area of Ireland

For more details, see this website link WHO WE ARE, with Drop down menu –HISTORY and BOOKS.
The drop down menu in WHAT WE DO provides insights into how and where the seed, planted in Dublin in 1717, has grown and sprouted other branches in the following three centuries.

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Summer-Newsletter-2017

The chapel in Channel Row merits attention for several reasons. At times, events that occurred there were known to the “authorities”. A 1727 document refers to a famous convent in Channel Row, “where the most celebrated Italian musicians help to make the voices of the Holy Sisters more melodious; and many Protestant Fine Gentlemen have been invited to take their places in a convenient gallery, and hear the performances.”

On other occasions, “clandestine” activities took place, which, if discovered by the priest-catchers, earned them rewards. The nuns remained undaunted. By 1744, three bishops, on different occasions, were consecrated in the chapel, unknown to the “authorities”. Less fortunate were two Dominican priests found in the convent earlier in 1744. They were arrested and imprisoned. “Paid in charity for ye prisoners” appears quite often in the convent account books. In 1745, all Catholic churches were allowed to re-open. (As mentioned previously, enactment of the Penal Laws varied depending on the political situation.)
[to be continued in part 7]

From Sr. Maris Stella McKeown, Archivist, Mission Area of Ireland

For more details, see this website link WHO WE ARE, with Drop down menu –HISTORY and BOOKS.
The drop down menu in WHAT WE DO provides insights into how and where the seed, planted in Dublin in 1717, has grown and sprouted other branches in the following three centuries.

 

Recently, Dominican schools in Ballyfermot, Capetown, and Portstewart celebrated anniversaries, 60, 80 and 100 years, respectively. What do they have in common? They are some of the branches of the Galway Dominican family tree planted in Dublin 300 years ago. At that time, Penal laws did not permit education for Catholics. In spite of possible penalties, the Channel Row convent, in October 1719, was one of the first to open its doors to Catholic girls. Numbers increased each month for a time until it reached an average of about 20 pupils. Some remained in the school for short periods only; others stayed a year or two. The fee was £12 per annum payable in instalments.

A 1731 report noted “a nunnery in Channel Row commonly goes under the name of a boarding school.” The education was that deemed suitable for young ladies of their social status who would take their places afterwards as cultured and accomplished women. Some opted to become members of the community. The 1725 list of names shows that many of them were of the same social background as the nuns e.g. Burke, Nugent, Browne, Plunkett.

Religious Education, English, French, Music, Drawing, were taught. Later accounts also mention arithmetic, geography, history and needlework. Dancing was an optional extra, taught by a dancing master!

When the school was thriving in the mid 1740s and 1750s, for other reasons, it merited a mention in Dublin newspapers: in 1743 “a young lady died suddenly as she was at dinner”; in 1754 “some villains broke into the Nunnery and carried off several valuable goods belonging to the young ladies who board there.” [to be continued in part 6]

 

From Sr. Maris Stella McKeown, Archivist, Mission Area of Ireland

For more details, see this website link WHO WE ARE, with Drop down menu –HISTORY and BOOKS.
The drop down menu in WHAT WE DO provides insights into how and where the seed, planted in Dublin in 1717, has grown and sprouted other branches in the following three centuries.

Mrs Bellew’s “family”, in Channel Row, consisted of three groups of women- the nuns, girl boarders and parlour boarders. The latter were widows or single women who needed accommodation and who could afford to pay rent or, as they called it, a ‘pension. Some of the lady boarders or ‘parlour boarders’ had personal maids and so had a ‘suite’ of rooms, probably two or even three. [A further instalment of this series will elaborate.] Since penal laws still existed when the nuns came to Dublin, “they did not draw attention to themselves by wearing a religious habit. They conducted their boarding school, looked after the parlour boarders and lived their religious life in common. Their daily routine included the recitation of the Divine Office, meditation, and other prayers.” “the boarders who came to be educated were nieces of the nuns themselves or from other Anglo Norman families.” The Channel Row nuns earned the main part of their living through the boarding school fees and the parlour boarders’ pensions. They were also the recipients of donations in kind: church plate and gifts of money, usually small amounts. Before the banking system as we know it today, a system of “bonds” for the nuns’ dowries, (usually not used during their lifetime) provided income from the associated interest. At times, however, they had to borrow money from friends and family, especially when expected income was overdue. [Details from Kealy’s book] The young ladies’ education will be described in part 5

From Sr. Maris Stella McKeown, Archivist, Mission Area of Ireland

For more details, see this website link WHO WE ARE, with Drop down menu –HISTORY and BOOKS.
The drop down menu in WHAT WE DO provides insights into how and where the seed, planted in Dublin in 1717, has grown and sprouted other branches in the following three centuries.

 

 

Star of the Sea Retreat and Conference Centre Mullaghmore, Co.Sligo
Wednesday, May 24th – Tuesday, May 30th 2017
Centering Prayer Intensive Retreat for those with an established practice. God is Love teachings by Cistercian Thomas Keating on Evolution and Higher States of Consciousness. There will be opportunity to meet individually with the retreat facilitators.
Facilitators: Fionnuala Quinn O.P. and Blanaid Gallagher O.P. Registration at staroftheseacentre@gmail.com

Dominican Retreat Centre, Ennismore, Co. Cork
Sunday, July 16th – Friday, 21st 2017
Centering Prayer Intensive Retreat for those with an established practice. The Gift of Life: Death and Dying, Life and Living. The retreat presents Cistercian Thomas Keating on DVD offering a vision of hope about death that is counter cultural. There will be opportunity to meet individually with the retreat facilitators.
Facilitators: Fionnuala Quinn O.P. and Lesley O’ Connor Registration at ennismore@eircom.net

Emmaus Retreat and Conference Centre, Swords, Co. Dublin
Monday, June 12th – Friday, June 16th 2017                                                                                Centering Prayer Intensive Retreat Introducing The Welcoming Prayer: Embracing Living
The Welcoming Prayer is a method of consenting to God’s presence and action in our physical and emotional reactions to events and situations in daily life. It’s a letting go in the present moment, in the midst of the activity in daily life. There will be opportunity to meet individually with the retreat facilitators.
Facilitator: Denis Gleeson cfc and Fionnuala Quinn O.P. Registration: Emmaus@emmaus.com

Emmaus Retreat and Conference Centre, Swords, Co. Dublin Monday,
September 11th – Friday, September 15th 2016
Centering Prayer Introductory Retreat For Beginners
You will learn and method and principles of this prayer practice and have opportunity this ancient method in a quiet, reflective atmosphere.There will be four presentations on the Method of Centering Prayer, and DVD presentations in order to deepen the practice. There will be opportunity to meet individually with the retreat facilitators.
Facilitator: Denis Gleeson cfc and Rev’d Robert Lawson Registration: Emmaus@emmaus.com

 

For more information on Contemplative Outreach click here

Catherine of Siena, 14th Century Lay Dominican, and Doctor of the Church

Loving greetings and communion of prayer on this feast of Catherine, so dear to Dominicans throughout the world.  Special Patron of our Congregation of Sisters who keep this feast as a Solemnity, Catherine belongs to the whole Church, in dialogue with God, and in service of Christ’s reign of truth and justice, love and peace, in the world  Today, we continue to draw from the deep well of Catherine’s wisdom: –

“All the way to heaven is heaven, because Jesus said, “I am the way.”
“I also wish you to look at the Bridge of My only-begotten Son, and see the greatness thereof, for it reaches from Heaven to earth, that is, that the earth of your humanity is joined to the greatness of the Deity thereby.”
“Love follows knowledge.”
“The soul is in God and God in the soul, just as the fish is in the sea and the sea in the fish.”
“Turn over the rudder in God’s name, and sail with the wind heaven sends us.”

Prayer
Oh glorious St. Catherine, Champion of the Church of Christ, and of His vicar on earth,
Doctor rich in wisdom, peace-maker among peoples, friend and guide of souls,
obtain for us the wisdom that will make us Saints, and for the world, a lasting peace,
through Christ Our Lord.

 

Sr. Francis Krige OP

Archbishop Stephen Brislin

At the official blessing of Rosary House by Archbishop Stephen Brislin recently, Sr. Francis Krige OP, Mission Area Prioress congratulated the architects who designed Rosary House, Cape Town, South Africa as follows –  We thank Charlotte Chamberlain and Nicky Irving, who designed our home – a home that we, as Sisters, love. A place full of light and warmth and beauty with a connection to the outside garden and the school environment.

 

 

The #SDGchallenge is a 17 month long project. It will allow you to gain a deeper understanding of each of the Global Goals. If you want to do more than to learn about them and  want you to be part of them – Join the growing community of active citizens and take the challenge!


Development Perspectives is a Development Education NGO and registered charity based in Drogheda, County Louth, Ireland and is part of a national and global network of curious, critical thinkers and development practitioners working for social justice.  

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